Faouzia Hilmy,  calligrapher

One of the few women Arabic calligraphers in a traditionally male-dominated field.

Faouzia Hilmy, French-Moroccan calligrapher, living in Paris.

One of the few women Arabic calligraphers in a traditionally male-dominated field.

Faouzia Hilmy is French-Moroccan, born in the south of france, in Toulouse.

After Faouzia Hilmy got her masters in marketing she couldn’t find her direction in life and she spent many years searching for it. When Faouzia was 29, she went to the USA, because she wanted to discover America…
One day, while she was sitting on a bench opposite San Francisco Bay, she felt moved to pray: ‘Please help me find my way’. She prayed so hard that her prayer was answered. When she went back to France a miracle happened.
Faouzia was in a cafe when she saw an ad for Arabic calligraphy courses by a Syrian calligrapher. The next day she took her first lesson. She turned out to be a revelation for her. She was fascinated by the letters, with their complex yet harmonious forms . They reminded me of the Arabic lessons she had taken as a child and as a teenager.

The passion for this millenial art has never left her.

Faouzia Hilmy decided to drop everything and devotes all of her time and energy to learning arabic calligraphy.
It took her several years to learn it and it was very demanding, but Faouzia stuck it out and started a blog on the Internet while creating her first calligraphy artwork. The blog was very successful; individuals and well-known brands started contacting her to create artwork and advertisements.

Faouzia began exhibiting in Toulouse and Paris before going to other countries : Egypt, Mauritius, Morocco, Dubai…
Today Faouzia Hilmy collaborates with luxury brands like Hermes and Armani for projects in the Middle-East and she designs logos for French and Arabic TV shows.

She has become one of the few women Arabic calligraphers in a traditionally male-dominated field of activity.

What inspires her? Colour, nature, the plumage of birds or the beauty of a flower but also high fashion and artisanal art. Her stylistic purity speaks of her sensitivity and her personality. Her calligraphy is also a means for Faouzia to express her message of tolerance, and brotherhood, themes which are important to her.